Minimal Respect for Minimalism

I think minimalism is overrated.

I could be ironic and end my post with that, but I’d rather defend my view. In the sense I mean the term, I’m not referring to minimalist art (which isn’t overrated, but terrible), where the term originated. Minimalism is one voice in our cacophonous Zeitgeist. It declares “Your possessions rule you. Banish them and rule yourself.” It usually amounts to people bragging about how few possessions they have.

As trendy as minimalism is, I think it suffers from three fundamental flaws:

  1. It depends on a flawed theological view of ownership.
  2. It is a hobby for wealthy people with tech jobs and no one else.
  3. It pretends to make people care less about their belongings while making people spend more time thinking about their belongings.

First, minimalism presumes that ownership is inherently bad and possessions are a necessary evil. On the contrary, and as I’ve written before, owning possessions – including large, maintained, curated collections – is actually good for us. We are creatures who create, and creation requires some maintenance. Especially for men, I’ve found, keeping good collections is a source of virtue. This makes sense; the created world has been declared good already. Why arbitrarily limit yourself when it comes to possessions just for the sake of a trend?

Second, minimalism is not something that anybody can do whenever they want. It requires some serious wealth and a particular sort of job. I see this all the time with people who blog or build websites. They seem to think that they’ve become enlightened by some fad like minimalism or a 4-hour work week, and they write books and articles which make them even more money in the process.

But imagine a carpenter trying to live the minimalist life. A common minimalist challenge is to live with 100 items or fewer. Have you ever tried to run a wood shop with one hundred items or fewer? As an amateur woodworker myself, I own well over one hundred hand tools, let alone power tools. And then there’s all the stains and finishes. And speaking of the 4-hour workweek, exactly how do I build bookshelves at 10x speed?

Or consider a plumber, who probably carries well over one hundred tools in his truck from job site to job site, with hundreds more in a shop.

No one working a trade – or any job outside of the tech world – can do their job with a laptop and a backpack. That’s a luxury for very specific jobs, as apparently is the smugness that accompanies it.

It’s more than just certain jobs which are incompatible with minimalism. The fact is, the worse off you are financially, the more you need to rely on keeping large stocks of things. A wealthy person can afford to replace his overpriced macbook if it falls to the ground. A poor person needs to keep old PC’s around since he can’t replace anything. A wealthy person can afford minimalism because he takes no risk in giving away the insurance of holding extra possessions. A poor person’s wealth is probably not much more than that insurance.

And then there are families, which pose a whole new set of problems. Single men and women might get away with living out of a backpack, but as a father of two young boys, I can barely survive a car ride without bringing multiple bags of baby gear with me. That’s three categories of reasons to dismiss minimalism as a luxury of a particular group of people. Those people are free to do as they please, but it would be better for everyone if they realized just how unique their situation is.

Finally, and probably most importantly, minimalism undermines its own efforts. If you spend your time thinking about how much you think about your possessions, you will not improve your situation by thinking about them even more. Getting rid of junk you don’t want is one thing, but constantly reassessing which possessions you can part with is still a way of thinking about your possessions.

A much better thing to do with your time is to not think about your possessions at all. If you have clutter you don’t like, spend a weekend getting rid of junk you don’t want. Otherwise, don’t worry about it. In doing that, you’ll accomplish the stated goal of minimalism better than any minimalist approach.

You can be ruled by a desire to acquire more things, but you can also be ruled by a desire to control what you possess through minimalism. Stop worrying about it. There are more important things to spend your time thinking about.

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